Biodiversity #1 – Natural Science Backpack

The materials presented here are designed primarily for primary school students between the ages of 6 and 14. They were created through collaboration with researchers from various fields, including early childhood education and forest pedagogy, as well as teachers and students themselves. The activity utilizes an inquiry-based approach and a formative evaluation process to optimize the materials, which serve as a self-learning kit.

Clean Water & Sanitation #5 – History Research on Local Water System and Uses

The aim of this activity is to raise awareness of the impact of technological progress on everyday life and of health and hygiene improvements brought about by the advent of drinking and wastewater treatment processes. The project results are shown in panels, designed by the different groups of students in cooperation with the art history and history and water utility experts and can be the object of exhibitions open to other students, families and the general community.

Clean Water & Sanitation #4 – Water Blind Tasting

Research shows that tap water is just as safe as bottled water and is often not significantly different in taste. In contrast, tap water is generally a better option, since it has a much lower environmental impact and costs considerably less. This experience is useful for working out common perceptions around the topic and discussing water drinking habits.

Perceptions at the tasting experience can be compared to the results of analytical tests on several types of drinking water, allowing participants to debunk myths and fake news regarding water quality and taste.

Vaccination #2 – Ethical discussion: General or partial mandatory vaccination

The aim of this activity is to strengthen students’ analytical and critical thinking skills on a socially relevant and controversial issue. By discussing whether vaccinations should be mandatory, and if so, under which conditions, students apply the knowledge of immune biology they have acquired before. In addition, they add an ethics perspective to their factual information by considering personal and societal values.

Vaccination #1 – Classroom game: Spread of a viral infection

The aim of this activity is to provide students with an engaging and enduring learning experience, allowing them to grasp the rapidity with which viral infections can spread. Furthermore, the game serves as a valuable tool for instilling awareness regarding the importance of implementing effective protective measures. Through this experiential exercise, students gain not only knowledge but also a deeper understanding of the necessity for appropriate safeguards in the face of viral threats.

Forests toolkit #1 – Humans and the forests: Interviews with three generations

Forests are one of our most important natural resources, and part of the solution to the challenges we face. People and stakeholders have different interests in forests, underpinned by environmental, economic, cultural and social values. Often, these interests and values conflict with one another. How to manage forests is a complex and highly topical issue.

The aim of this activity is to place the forest theme in an authentic, local and historic context, and to highlight its relevance to students’ everyday lives. Conducting this activity contributes to highlighting different perspectives on the topic of Forest use vs. Forest protection.

Biodiversity and Agriculture toolkit

Protecting biodiversity while ensuring food security for people is one of the major challenges of our time. Human intervention in nature affects biological diversity, with traditional agriculture playing a central role. Land use change, pesticides and disease control measures lead to a drastic decline in various plant and animal populations.
How can we strike a balance between environmental protection and food security? To bring younger elementary school students into contact with these topics, this toolkit introduces key concepts in biodiversity and agriculture through outdoor learning activities.