Biodiversity and Agriculture #1 – Research Diary

The aim of the activity is to secure the experiences and deepen the knowledge that the students gain during their visit to a farm. The material can be adapted to the respective circumstances as needed and serves as a memory aid for the lessons that build upon the farm visit.

Clean Water & Sanitation #5 – History Research on Local Water System and Uses

The aim of this activity is to raise awareness of the impact of technological progress on everyday life and of health and hygiene improvements brought about by the advent of drinking and wastewater treatment processes. The project results are shown in panels, designed by the different groups of students in cooperation with the art history and history and water utility experts and can be the object of exhibitions open to other students, families and the general community.

Clean Water & Sanitation #4 – Water Blind Tasting

Research shows that tap water is just as safe as bottled water and is often not significantly different in taste. In contrast, tap water is generally a better option, since it has a much lower environmental impact and costs considerably less. This experience is useful for working out common perceptions around the topic and discussing water drinking habits.

Perceptions at the tasting experience can be compared to the results of analytical tests on several types of drinking water, allowing participants to debunk myths and fake news regarding water quality and taste.

Clean Water & Sanitation #3 – Authentic learning task “Your home water”

The aim of this activity is to engage students in an analysis of locally distributed waters, encouraging collaboration to build and evaluate knowledge. The authentic learning task involves the student group in the evaluation of analytical certificates of their home/school waters, with analysis, assessment and critical considerations on the characteristics of specific tap waters and the related impact on human health.

Forests toolkit #3 – How is the debate on forests portrayed by the media?

The aim of this activity is to enable students’ engagement in meaningful science-society interaction and the development of critical thinking competence in the area of “Forest use vs. Forest Protection”. It enables students to gain insights into the work and considerations of a journalist and highlight core aspects which distinguish journalism from opinion-makers with different agendas. At the same time, students gain insight into local forest-related issues.

Forests toolkit #1 – Humans and the forests: Interviews with three generations

Forests are one of our most important natural resources, and part of the solution to the challenges we face. People and stakeholders have different interests in forests, underpinned by environmental, economic, cultural and social values. Often, these interests and values conflict with one another. How to manage forests is a complex and highly topical issue.

The aim of this activity is to place the forest theme in an authentic, local and historic context, and to highlight its relevance to students’ everyday lives. Conducting this activity contributes to highlighting different perspectives on the topic of Forest use vs. Forest protection.

Antimicrobial Resistance #4 – Development of the open schooling projects

The aim of this activity is to promote knowledge construction and validation, creative action, as well as self-efficacy through collaboration among the students to create possible solutions to AMR while taking ownership of their learning. The activity introduces students to their mission to start an awareness-raising campaign for AMR consisting of different open schooling projects, thus having an impact at the local level. The different open schooling projects and guiding steps are summarised in the Students’ resources section below.

Antimicrobial Resistance #3 – Bacterial resistance to antibiotics: An authentic experience

The aim of this activity is to initiate collaboration between educational and non-educational agents, raise students’ awareness of science-related careers through meaningful interaction with experts, and enhance students’ interest in science through activities developed in an authentic context related to AMR.

The activity develops in two steps: (1) Meeting the experts in school and (2) Engaging in authentic activities at the experts’ facilities. It is important to note that aside from the relevant background of the experts (i.e., microbiologist, molecular biologist, biochemist, biotechnologist, geneticist), a set of criteria should be defined for their selection in terms of gender, ethnicity, religion and socioeconomic status in order to maximise inclusivity. Moreover, coordination meetings need to be arranged between the teachers and the experts before the interaction with the students.

Biodiversity and Agriculture toolkit

Protecting biodiversity while ensuring food security for people is one of the major challenges of our time. Human intervention in nature affects biological diversity, with traditional agriculture playing a central role. Land use change, pesticides and disease control measures lead to a drastic decline in various plant and animal populations.
How can we strike a balance between environmental protection and food security? To bring younger elementary school students into contact with these topics, this toolkit introduces key concepts in biodiversity and agriculture through outdoor learning activities.