Antimicrobial Resistance #3 – Mutation and resistant bacteria spread (Sequence 2)

The aim of this activity is to help students facilitate students’ comprehension of three key concepts concerning antimicrobial resistance and its connection to the growing environment. The first idea to underscore is that bacteria grow exponentially under ideal environment conditions. The second one is the idea that in some bacterial replication some random DNA mutations can occur, the apparition of this mutations are random. The third idea is that, despite the death of some bacteria due to antibiotic presence in the environment, those that randomly mutate and develop resistance continue to proliferate.

Antimicrobial Resistance #1 – A visit to the doctor (Sequence 2)

The aim of this activity is double. Firstly, to know students’ initial ideas of key elements on the topic of the teaching and learning sequence, including ideas such as pathogenic microorganism, targeted medicine, and antimicrobial resistance. Secondly, presenting the topic of ARM by introducing different medical cases to analyse.

Antimicrobial Resistance #4 – Development of the open schooling projects (Sequence 1)

The aim of this activity is to promote knowledge construction and validation, creative action, as well as self-efficacy through collaboration among the students to create possible solutions to AMR while taking ownership of their learning. The activity introduces students to their mission to start an awareness-raising campaign for AMR consisting of different open schooling projects, thus having an impact at the local level. The different open schooling projects and guiding steps are summarised in the Students’ resources section below.

Antimicrobial Resistance #3 – Bacterial resistance to antibiotics: An authentic experience (Sequence 1)

The aim of this activity is to initiate collaboration between educational and non-educational agents, raise students’ awareness of science-related careers through meaningful interaction between experts and students, and enhance students’ interest in science through activities developed in an authentic context related to AMR. The activity evolves in two steps: (1) Meeting the experts in school and (2) Engaging in authentic activities at the experts’ facilities. It is important to note that aside from the relevant background of the experts (i.e., microbiologist, molecular biologist, biochemist, biotechnologist, geneticist), a set of criteria should be listed for their selection in terms of gender, ethnicity, religion and SOE status in order to maximise inclusivity. Moreover, coordination meetings need to be arranged between the teachers and the experts before the interaction with the students.

Antimicrobial Resistance #2 – Should we ban the use of antibiotics for flu treatment? (Sequence 1)

The aim of this activity is to introduce students to sustained inquiry by training argumentation as a scientific practice. It provides students with the opportunity to reflect on the available information and prompts them to create possible solutions for the issue of AMR. Initially, there is an introduction to a simple definition of an argument, the components of an argument, the identification of an argument, and how to formulate a strong argument. After practising formulating arguments based on a rubric, the students get prepared to organise a debate on the topic: We should ban the use of antibiotics for flu treatment. Do you agree or disagree?

Antimicrobial Resistance #1 – What do you think about AMR? Stakeholders’ views (Sequence 1)

This activity explores AMR from the perspective of different stakeholders in order to document the issue, elaborate on the challenges to be addressed and practice critical thinking. Authentic media items are provided to students, representing the positions of different societal actors. The goal is to raise awareness of the issue and reflect on the credibility of the information using an information literacy test. It is important to note that the activity is introduced after an initial brainstorming to get students familiar with basic facts and knowledge related to bacteria, antibiotics and resistance.

Antimicrobial resistance toolkit

Overwhelming evidence shows that increased use, over-prescription and overconsumption are leading to an increase in antibiotic-resistant bugs. However, many people overuse and misuse anti-microbial chemicals because they lack knowledge about infections and anti-microbial agents – a critical issue around the globe that is affecting our health and putting our lives at risk. Thus, a vital step towards tackling this issue is to address it in education classrooms and through informed action.

This toolkit helps teachers to engage students and their families to develop a deeper understanding of the topic through first-hand experiences with relevant stakeholders, ultimately enabling them to make better-informed decisions about the use of antibiotics.