Clean Water & Sanitation #5 – History Research on Local Water System and Uses

The aim of this activity is to raise awareness of the impact of technological progress on everyday life and of health and hygiene improvements brought about by the advent of drinking and wastewater treatment processes. The project results are shown in panels, designed by the different groups of students in cooperation with the art history and history and water utility experts and can be the object of exhibitions open to other students, families and the general community.

Clean Water & Sanitation #4 – Water Blind Tasting

Research shows that tap water is just as safe as bottled water and is often not significantly different in taste. In contrast, tap water is generally a better option, since it has a much lower environmental impact and costs considerably less. This experience is useful for working out common perceptions around the topic and discussing water drinking habits.

Perceptions at the tasting experience can be compared to the results of analytical tests on several types of drinking water, allowing participants to debunk myths and fake news regarding water quality and taste.

Clean Water & Sanitation #3 – Authentic learning task “Your home water”

The aim of this activity is to engage students in an analysis of locally distributed waters, encouraging collaboration to build and evaluate knowledge. The authentic learning task involves the student group in the evaluation of analytical certificates of their home/school waters, with analysis, assessment and critical considerations on the characteristics of specific tap waters and the related impact on human health.

Clean Water & Sanitation #2 – Debate “Tap Water vs Bottled Water”

The aim of this activity is to make students aware of the environmental impact of their water consumption habits and to contrast preconceived ideas and distrust of tap water with evaluating evidence and supporting claims. Students learn to develop argumentative skills and formulate creative solutions to this socio-scientific issue.

Vaccination #2 – Ethical discussion: General or partial mandatory vaccination

The aim of this activity is to strengthen students’ analytical and critical thinking skills on a socially relevant and controversial issue. By discussing whether vaccinations should be mandatory, and if so, under which conditions, students apply the knowledge of immune biology they have acquired before. In addition, they add an ethics perspective to their factual information by considering personal and societal values.

Vaccination #1 – Classroom game: Spread of a viral infection

The aim of this activity is to provide students with an engaging and enduring learning experience, allowing them to grasp the rapidity with which viral infections can spread. Furthermore, the game serves as a valuable tool for instilling awareness regarding the importance of implementing effective protective measures. Through this experiential exercise, students gain not only knowledge but also a deeper understanding of the necessity for appropriate safeguards in the face of viral threats.

Clean Water & Sanitation toolkit

Water management is crucial to sustainable development because clean freshwater and sanitation services are essential to human health and well-being.

Water doesn’t flow out of the tap by magic and sewage must be collected and treated: this implies long and complex processes, involving pipes and plants, state-of-the-art technologies, continuous quality control, machines, materials and energy. While substantial progress has been made to achieve the integrated management of water resources, billions of people still lack access to safe drinking water and sanitation. In this toolkit, schools and communities are be engaged to increase their scientific understanding of water management and sustainability. Students also undertake concrete actions to encourage sustainable behaviours to save and protect water resources and safeguard the environment.

Vaccination toolkit

Why do people remain unvaccinated? Globally, vaccination programmes have repeatedly led to heated debates.

In this toolkit, teachers and students discover different perspectives, including the two often-conflicting aims of protecting public health and individual autonomy at the same time. Activities include a game simulating the spread of a virus, and an ethical discussion on benefits and effects of vaccinations.