Connecting schools and society #1 – How to prepare a video shoot

The aim of this activity is to foster students’ skill to communicate their own knowledge to others in an interesting and sustainable way. They learn to take the perspective of others and deal intensively with the topic in order to decide what information is relevant and how to present it best. This encourages creativity and deepens their own knowledge. In addition, students learn how to use media professionally and to create educational videos independently of the topic.

Forests toolkit #4 – Different perspectives on forest use

This teaching-learning sequence consists of two activities that can be used as an introduction for students’ work with the theme Forest us vs. Forest protection. It particularly familiarizes students with some different perspectives on and relationships with the forest. The two activities are especially suitable for use in topics such as Forest use vs. Forest protection, where several subjects (e.g. science, cívics, Language, technology) can be combined.

Biodiversity and Agriculture #1 – Research Diary

The aim of the activity is to secure the experiences and deepen the knowledge that the students gain during their visit to a farm. The material can be adapted to the respective circumstances as needed and serves as a memory aid for the lessons that build upon the farm visit.

Biodiversity #1 – Natural Science Backpack

The materials presented here are designed primarily for primary school students between the ages of 6 and 14. They were created through collaboration with researchers from various fields, including early childhood education and forest pedagogy, as well as teachers and students themselves. The activity utilizes an inquiry-based approach and a formative evaluation process to optimize the materials, which serve as a self-learning kit.

Clean Water & Sanitation #5 – History Research on Local Water System and Uses

The aim of this activity is to raise awareness of the impact of technological progress on everyday life and of health and hygiene improvements brought about by the advent of drinking and wastewater treatment processes. The project results are shown in panels, designed by the different groups of students in cooperation with the art history and history and water utility experts and can be the object of exhibitions open to other students, families and the general community.

Clean Water & Sanitation #4 – Water Blind Tasting

Research shows that tap water is just as safe as bottled water and is often not significantly different in taste. In contrast, tap water is generally a better option, since it has a much lower environmental impact and costs considerably less. This experience is useful for working out common perceptions around the topic and discussing water drinking habits.

Perceptions at the tasting experience can be compared to the results of analytical tests on several types of drinking water, allowing participants to debunk myths and fake news regarding water quality and taste.

Clean Water & Sanitation #3 – Authentic learning task “Your home water”

The aim of this activity is to engage students in an analysis of locally distributed waters, encouraging collaboration to build and evaluate knowledge. The authentic learning task involves the student group in the evaluation of analytical certificates of their home/school waters, with analysis, assessment and critical considerations on the characteristics of specific tap waters and the related impact on human health.

Clean Water & Sanitation #2 – Debate “Tap Water vs Bottled Water”

The aim of this activity is to make students aware of the environmental impact of their water consumption habits and to contrast preconceived ideas and distrust of tap water with evaluating evidence and supporting claims. Students learn to develop argumentative skills and formulate creative solutions to this socio-scientific issue.

Forests toolkit #1 – Humans and the forests: Interviews with three generations

Forests are one of our most important natural resources, and part of the solution to the challenges we face. People and stakeholders have different interests in forests, underpinned by environmental, economic, cultural and social values. Often, these interests and values conflict with one another. How to manage forests is a complex and highly topical issue.

The aim of this activity is to place the forest theme in an authentic, local and historic context, and to highlight its relevance to students’ everyday lives. Conducting this activity contributes to highlighting different perspectives on the topic of Forest use vs. Forest protection.